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Interview with Jung Daeryong of TASTY for Fiasco Digital

Interview with Jung Daeryong of TASTY for Fiasco Digital

Interview with Raleigh Ritchie for FIASCO magazine

Interview with Raleigh Ritchie for FIASCO magazine

Interview with the Queen of Berlin’s techno scene: Ellen Allien (for Schön! magazine)

Interview with the Queen of Berlin’s techno scene: Ellen Allien (for Schön! magazine)

Interview with Tiffany/SNSD for Dazed Digital

Interview with Tiffany/SNSD for Dazed Digital

FOSTER THE PEOPLE for Fiasco Digital

FOSTER THE PEOPLE for Fiasco Digital

Interviewing the fiesty Taylor Momsen for FIASCO Digital
Credit all images/text if lifting from the site

Interviewing the fiesty Taylor Momsen for FIASCO Digital

Credit all images/text if lifting from the site

As 2NE1 return I count down K-Pop’s most futuristic/sci-fi MV’s for Dazed and Confused

As 2NE1 return I count down K-Pop’s most futuristic/sci-fi MV’s for Dazed and Confused

Random fact alert. I met Elyar Fox at house party in 2012.
[[MORE]]
He was with his pseudo-manager Jamesy, and we exchanged some banter.  He said he was a singer. In this business you meet a lot of people who are singers. Or actors. Or whatever. You talk about it and move on. My lingering memory was he was sassy with a capital S. The party got bigger and he disappeared into the scrum. Never saw him again until he popped up on my TV screen and now I’m sat next to him on a tastefully vintage velvet couch in East London sharing a sandwich. Funny how things work out.
Nothing’s funny about Elyar’s fast rising career. A debut single in at #5 on the UK charts. Millions of Youtube hits. He’s on his second label deal, having moved from a stagnating stint at Polydor to RCA, and got his army of Foxers supporting his every move. That naughty glint is still in his eyes. He talks about concept albums, his love of The Used and notably their epic In Love And Death. “This isn’t the greatest pop interview, is it?” he laughs.
Ok, well, let’s talk pop. Namely your pop music. It must be satisfying seeing yourself fly into the top 5 on your debut.
I am happy but next step is #1. I like #5 because you’ve got something to build on.

Do you mind being known as “Elyar Fox – Youtube sensation”?

It seems like everyone is a Youtube sensation now. People say that and I’m like, ‘well, am I?’ That’s where I started from as a solo artist. I was in a band from age 13-16, and then that’s when I started to do my own stuff and did some Youtube videos that blew up. I don’t know, I don’t consider myself too huge on Youtube.

Is it a hinderence then, to be tagged like that?
Well, Youtube is good in a sense, it makes things just a bit easier. It’s a great way to get yourself discovered and I think having, like, 100,000 views is good because 1 or 2 of those could be label people or A&R scouts. That’s why it’s is great.
On the flipside the type of person to be discovered on Youtube is a certain type of artist and you have to cover particular songs, which you did, to make sure people come looking.

Yeah, I knew people would like those and I knew the music I was starting to write at the time was pop, so I thought, that’s the kind of music I want to cover. But I wouldn’t cover anything I didn’t like. If you’re in a cool indie band, there are different ways of going about it, Youtube maybe isn’t that way, it’s doing the right gigs at the right venues. Everyone has their way of doing it and Youtube was for me.

I keep seeing the word “hustled” used to describe your way of getting a record deal. It’s an interesting term to use as it sounds a little dark, a little hard edged. Was that the case?

Yeah, I would hustle, I’d meet one person, me and Jamesy, who was pretending to be my manager. I was 16, he was 17. Anyway, we’d meet one then make them introduce us to someone else. We’d go out and stuff… yeah, we did it, it was an overwhelming time. I left my email on my Youtube channel and interested people emailed me and word got around. I went to meet them with my acoustic and played them a couple of songs I’d written, a cover, and I did that to a lot of people.

Pop is notorious for image changes – have you managed to keep control of what you as an artist want to do?

I’ve always had a vision of what I wanted to do. Every other week I’m coming up with ideas and done what I wanted. Luckily I now only work with people who know what I want, actually that’s why it didn’t work out with my first label, because their idea of me was completely different. I’ve learned you need a team who believes in you and shares the same vision and now I’ve got that.
How much of your songwriting has the same amount of self control? There have been names cropping up like Wayne Hector (Westlife, The Wanted), Karen Poole (Kylie Minogue, Janet Jackson) and Cutfather (One Direction) as partners.
‘Do It All Over Again’ I wrote with Chris Young who produced it. Sometimes I co-write, sometimes I do it myself. I’ve been lucky enough to work with producers I’ve always wanted to work with. I went and gave it my all and done some really cool sessions. I love that. I wrote on my own until I was 16 (then) what I wanted to do was get someone else in, someone with a different viewpoint so we can bounce off each other. It’s better, it’s personal preference, but even if it’s not a songwriter then a producer, someone who can say, that sucks, or say, what if you swap that with that.
Over 100 songs were written for your debut album but what makes a good Elyar Fox song?
One that is always in the back of your head. A monster hook. It depends… There’s what’s a great song as in, what’s a good single or pop song? Then there what’s a great song that means a lot to you? The album is kind of half and half. I call it a triangle of sounds in a circle of pop. It’s deep, but I’m a deep kind of guy (laughs). It’s got a clubby side to it, then it’s got an organic side, which I didn’t even notice was happening, a lot of acoustic and live drums. And there’s the edgier side, which is more rock. One of the singles coming up has an awesome guitar solo in it. I love all music.
With ‘Do It All Over Again’, I was in that session and I was meant to be chucking down some vocals on a song I wrote called ‘Colourblind’. But I was coming out of having a bad cold, so I went into the booth and started to sing and he was like, oh mate, this isn’t going to work. I was so bunged up, it sounded awful. So I came back into the room and we were like, shall we just write a song, and yeah, that song was an accident.
Can you sit down and focus on writing then or does it have to happen like that? A bit of a fateful moment?
I can, and some of the best songs I write on my own but I have this thing where I can’t finish it. I don’t finish anything.
You’re not a closer?
(laughs) Er, yeah, yeah, I’m a closer… but you’ve got to be in the right vibe, don’t you.
Is that indicative of your life? Can’t finish anything you start?
Mmmn, when I’ve got someone with me I do.
Erm, anyway. After some internet searching there was a rather random fact I saw, that your favourite number is 27.
I love 27. Everything is 27. The number of my house growing up was 27. It stands out to me, 27. It’s a good number, it’s everywhere. Sometimes I look at my clock and it’s 18:27. That’s a great time, I love 18:27.
I found that amazing fact on Tumblr page about you. Does the level of dedication already sent your way surprise you?
Sometimes people know things about me that I don’t even know. Or remember. But I like it. I’ve been sent some fanfics on Twitter before and I find it funny. It was about me and Jamesy, I didn’t read it all. But it’s nice to know people care about you and support you. As of late it can be a little intrusive at times but I’m okay with it, it’s part of it. You want to be a pop artist, then you deal with stuff like that.
Not every artist likes to have a game plan, some like to just see how it goes. Which are you?
I do have a game plan. I have this whole weird set up in my head. I won’t go into it all now but yeah, longevity is what every artist thinks of. There’s lots of things I’d like to do. One day I’d like to become a guitarist in cool Rolling Stones type band, and  be a backing singer and drink too much and have a breakdown (laughs). All I know is that I want to be performing and making music for as long as I can, so as long as I get to do that I won’t be complaining. I’m enjoying everything right now. We haven’t got anything locked in yet but I’d like to do my own solo tour this year.
What kind of show would it be, ideally?
A concept show, I’d love that. I’d love to put on a big production, visuals, storyline. Everything!

Interview by Taylor Glasby
Photographs by Danyiel Lowden

Random fact alert. I met Elyar Fox at house party in 2012.

Read More

Interview with Jung Daeryong of TASTY for Fiasco Digital

Interview with Jung Daeryong of TASTY for Fiasco Digital

Interview with Raleigh Ritchie for FIASCO magazine

Interview with Raleigh Ritchie for FIASCO magazine

Interview with the Queen of Berlin’s techno scene: Ellen Allien (for Schön! magazine)

Interview with the Queen of Berlin’s techno scene: Ellen Allien (for Schön! magazine)

Interview with Tiffany/SNSD for Dazed Digital

Interview with Tiffany/SNSD for Dazed Digital

FOSTER THE PEOPLE for Fiasco Digital

FOSTER THE PEOPLE for Fiasco Digital

REPTILE YOUTH for Fiasco Digital

REPTILE YOUTH for Fiasco Digital

BAND OF SKULLS for Fiasco Digital

BAND OF SKULLS for Fiasco Digital

Interviewing the fiesty Taylor Momsen for FIASCO Digital
Credit all images/text if lifting from the site

Interviewing the fiesty Taylor Momsen for FIASCO Digital

Credit all images/text if lifting from the site

As 2NE1 return I count down K-Pop’s most futuristic/sci-fi MV’s for Dazed and Confused

As 2NE1 return I count down K-Pop’s most futuristic/sci-fi MV’s for Dazed and Confused

Random fact alert. I met Elyar Fox at house party in 2012.
[[MORE]]
He was with his pseudo-manager Jamesy, and we exchanged some banter.  He said he was a singer. In this business you meet a lot of people who are singers. Or actors. Or whatever. You talk about it and move on. My lingering memory was he was sassy with a capital S. The party got bigger and he disappeared into the scrum. Never saw him again until he popped up on my TV screen and now I’m sat next to him on a tastefully vintage velvet couch in East London sharing a sandwich. Funny how things work out.
Nothing’s funny about Elyar’s fast rising career. A debut single in at #5 on the UK charts. Millions of Youtube hits. He’s on his second label deal, having moved from a stagnating stint at Polydor to RCA, and got his army of Foxers supporting his every move. That naughty glint is still in his eyes. He talks about concept albums, his love of The Used and notably their epic In Love And Death. “This isn’t the greatest pop interview, is it?” he laughs.
Ok, well, let’s talk pop. Namely your pop music. It must be satisfying seeing yourself fly into the top 5 on your debut.
I am happy but next step is #1. I like #5 because you’ve got something to build on.

Do you mind being known as “Elyar Fox – Youtube sensation”?

It seems like everyone is a Youtube sensation now. People say that and I’m like, ‘well, am I?’ That’s where I started from as a solo artist. I was in a band from age 13-16, and then that’s when I started to do my own stuff and did some Youtube videos that blew up. I don’t know, I don’t consider myself too huge on Youtube.

Is it a hinderence then, to be tagged like that?
Well, Youtube is good in a sense, it makes things just a bit easier. It’s a great way to get yourself discovered and I think having, like, 100,000 views is good because 1 or 2 of those could be label people or A&R scouts. That’s why it’s is great.
On the flipside the type of person to be discovered on Youtube is a certain type of artist and you have to cover particular songs, which you did, to make sure people come looking.

Yeah, I knew people would like those and I knew the music I was starting to write at the time was pop, so I thought, that’s the kind of music I want to cover. But I wouldn’t cover anything I didn’t like. If you’re in a cool indie band, there are different ways of going about it, Youtube maybe isn’t that way, it’s doing the right gigs at the right venues. Everyone has their way of doing it and Youtube was for me.

I keep seeing the word “hustled” used to describe your way of getting a record deal. It’s an interesting term to use as it sounds a little dark, a little hard edged. Was that the case?

Yeah, I would hustle, I’d meet one person, me and Jamesy, who was pretending to be my manager. I was 16, he was 17. Anyway, we’d meet one then make them introduce us to someone else. We’d go out and stuff… yeah, we did it, it was an overwhelming time. I left my email on my Youtube channel and interested people emailed me and word got around. I went to meet them with my acoustic and played them a couple of songs I’d written, a cover, and I did that to a lot of people.

Pop is notorious for image changes – have you managed to keep control of what you as an artist want to do?

I’ve always had a vision of what I wanted to do. Every other week I’m coming up with ideas and done what I wanted. Luckily I now only work with people who know what I want, actually that’s why it didn’t work out with my first label, because their idea of me was completely different. I’ve learned you need a team who believes in you and shares the same vision and now I’ve got that.
How much of your songwriting has the same amount of self control? There have been names cropping up like Wayne Hector (Westlife, The Wanted), Karen Poole (Kylie Minogue, Janet Jackson) and Cutfather (One Direction) as partners.
‘Do It All Over Again’ I wrote with Chris Young who produced it. Sometimes I co-write, sometimes I do it myself. I’ve been lucky enough to work with producers I’ve always wanted to work with. I went and gave it my all and done some really cool sessions. I love that. I wrote on my own until I was 16 (then) what I wanted to do was get someone else in, someone with a different viewpoint so we can bounce off each other. It’s better, it’s personal preference, but even if it’s not a songwriter then a producer, someone who can say, that sucks, or say, what if you swap that with that.
Over 100 songs were written for your debut album but what makes a good Elyar Fox song?
One that is always in the back of your head. A monster hook. It depends… There’s what’s a great song as in, what’s a good single or pop song? Then there what’s a great song that means a lot to you? The album is kind of half and half. I call it a triangle of sounds in a circle of pop. It’s deep, but I’m a deep kind of guy (laughs). It’s got a clubby side to it, then it’s got an organic side, which I didn’t even notice was happening, a lot of acoustic and live drums. And there’s the edgier side, which is more rock. One of the singles coming up has an awesome guitar solo in it. I love all music.
With ‘Do It All Over Again’, I was in that session and I was meant to be chucking down some vocals on a song I wrote called ‘Colourblind’. But I was coming out of having a bad cold, so I went into the booth and started to sing and he was like, oh mate, this isn’t going to work. I was so bunged up, it sounded awful. So I came back into the room and we were like, shall we just write a song, and yeah, that song was an accident.
Can you sit down and focus on writing then or does it have to happen like that? A bit of a fateful moment?
I can, and some of the best songs I write on my own but I have this thing where I can’t finish it. I don’t finish anything.
You’re not a closer?
(laughs) Er, yeah, yeah, I’m a closer… but you’ve got to be in the right vibe, don’t you.
Is that indicative of your life? Can’t finish anything you start?
Mmmn, when I’ve got someone with me I do.
Erm, anyway. After some internet searching there was a rather random fact I saw, that your favourite number is 27.
I love 27. Everything is 27. The number of my house growing up was 27. It stands out to me, 27. It’s a good number, it’s everywhere. Sometimes I look at my clock and it’s 18:27. That’s a great time, I love 18:27.
I found that amazing fact on Tumblr page about you. Does the level of dedication already sent your way surprise you?
Sometimes people know things about me that I don’t even know. Or remember. But I like it. I’ve been sent some fanfics on Twitter before and I find it funny. It was about me and Jamesy, I didn’t read it all. But it’s nice to know people care about you and support you. As of late it can be a little intrusive at times but I’m okay with it, it’s part of it. You want to be a pop artist, then you deal with stuff like that.
Not every artist likes to have a game plan, some like to just see how it goes. Which are you?
I do have a game plan. I have this whole weird set up in my head. I won’t go into it all now but yeah, longevity is what every artist thinks of. There’s lots of things I’d like to do. One day I’d like to become a guitarist in cool Rolling Stones type band, and  be a backing singer and drink too much and have a breakdown (laughs). All I know is that I want to be performing and making music for as long as I can, so as long as I get to do that I won’t be complaining. I’m enjoying everything right now. We haven’t got anything locked in yet but I’d like to do my own solo tour this year.
What kind of show would it be, ideally?
A concept show, I’d love that. I’d love to put on a big production, visuals, storyline. Everything!

Interview by Taylor Glasby
Photographs by Danyiel Lowden

Random fact alert. I met Elyar Fox at house party in 2012.

Read More

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